Podcasts

ByJoanne

Being Visible, Listened to and Respected

Susan works with very successful clients who have received feedback relating to how quiet they are and them needing to them to being more impactful.

Susan from an early age has been an introvert. Through her own life experience and client work she is aware that introverts tend to be underestimated and not as visible as they could be so can miss out on opportunities and be overlooked for promotions. In corporate culture it is not always the person that works the hardest that gets rewarded, it may be the person that is most vocal and seen.

 
Published Published: 21.01.2021 Recorded Recorded: 02.12.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:08:27 Downloads Downloads: 18
 

The way we were raised can have a huge impact on how we are perceived. We need to expose our merits, as this gets you recognised and remembered. Often, we need to escape our programming to be able to self-promote ourselves. It is a British trait and perpetuated by the media that we easily judge those doing well and try to drag them down. The rise in social media can bring out our ‘green eyed monster’.

Susan works with very successful clients who have received feedback relating to how quiet they are and them needing to make more impact. Inevitably these people are just more reflective and take time to consider what they want to say, before speaking. Culture in the corporate world seems to value those that are speaking up, over those that are speaking with high quality content. If a person is perceived as too quiet they are easy to be left behind or passed over. Susan believes if you are at the table in a meeting then it is your duty to share your opinion.

There will always be polarised opinions that become very divisive and do not allow any room for centralised discussion. We need a forum to allow people with different views to express themselves, without fear of being shouted down or ridiculed. We should be able to ask questions, learn other viewpoints and in that way either reinforce our own beliefs, or perhaps change our stance. This can be difficult to do as our ‘group’, the people we surround ourselves with tend to share our values/beliefs, so we are not challenged on our views. With rise of popularism and the internet, the unquestionable authority of professionals, medical etc is no longer believed as we can find research online that disagrees, despite this often having no supporting evidence.

Susan has created her own spoken communication model based on 5 key areas she has identified as being essential to speak more effectively with impact. The areas are; audience, content, preparation, performance and voice. She says you need to consider your audience in any communication, ensuring that your talk pitched at a level where people are engaged and will not switch off.  Speaking to be understood and recognise if you are not being and adapt your style.


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Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Susan Heaton-Wright Susan Heaton-Wright
Superstar Communicator
ByJoanne

Everybody can fit into the Soup model

Derek’s biggest Diversity and Inclusion wish is that there is no need for it because common sense and decency rule.

Derek believes we implement so many rules that people begin to look for loopholes and they lose their power. Derek argues we should change our approach, starting with pupils at school and stop worrying about what they are learning, instead teach them how to learn. Once they have that skill, they can learn anything that they wish, which will carry them through life. It should not matter who we meet in our lives, we should be able to rely on our listening and communication skills.

 
Published Published: 14.01.2021 Recorded Recorded: 30.11.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:03:58 Downloads Downloads: 31
 

Derek believes we need diversity in the widest sense, utilising and taking contributions from a variety of people to help develop creativity and innovation. Bringing together people in this way means we need to expand our vocabulary and be careful of language used.

It can be the case that people do not know how to, or do not want to educate themselves to learn about other cultures or people. Often, they can be worried about asking questions, especially due to the fear of getting it wrong or offending people. For some this fear leads them to avoid these interactions completely, which only exasperates the problem.

Another issue is that language is always evolving and understanding that certain phrases may cause offense to different people. We can change the way we interact with the world and talk; it just takes practice and the desire to learn. Our habits are not hard wired, it just comes down to the effort we are willing to put in. As a traveller and a guest in another country we cannot enforce our culture upon anyone, we need to learn their culture first. It needs to be a meeting of minds. We need to try and be culturally intelligent and not adhere to the stereotypical ‘Brits abroad.’

Councils are going to be regenerating cities and towns using a hybrid model of accommodation and retail post COVID. This pandemic will be the catalyst for more artisan, bespoke shops opening, as with the rise in online shopping, many of our high street stores become redundant. Derek believes that this pandemic has caused us to ask ourselves how different is your different, what is it that sets you apart and where is the value added. At the beginning of the pandemic presenters/speakers pivoted their offerings online and had a captive audience, but as more people started to do this they have needed to come up with new innovative ideas. We need to look at ourselves as not being like anyone else, being able to differentiate ourselves from others and be relatable to our audience. Finding a niche, rather than trying to sell everything to everyone.

Derek’s ‘soup model’ begets a hierarchy. The soup is the culture, an organic culture that just grows. The croutons are us, the people. He believes our worth should be measured by what we know, the trust networks, and our connections. In this model you are rewarded according to your contribution meaning that people would be able to stay where they are happiest without the desperate pressure to advance yourself. This would create globalisation of knowledge and creativity and could be a place that people are happier to live/work in. Derek believes everyone has a role to play within this.


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Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Derek Cheshire Derek Cheshire
Derek Cheshire
ByJoanne

Reducing your fear and anxiety

Mark offers people practical techniques and trauma guidance so that they are able to deal with whatever life may throw at them.

Fear and anxiety are universal and unless we manage to conquer them, they can hold us back from performing our best and reaching our potential. Despite the richness of our society there are still too many people that are discriminated against, mistreated, bullied, or ignored. Mark works on empowering these people and offering techniques on how to deal with this effectively and appropriately to ensure they can reach their full potential.

 
Published Published: 07.01.2021 Recorded Recorded: 30.11.2019 Episode Length Duration: 1:07:03 Downloads Downloads: 39
 

We all have unconscious biases and sometimes this can be overt prejudice, which can be very hard for the person on the receiving end to both accept and deal with. Mark works with his clients to develop coping techniques; ranging from communication techniques to staying calm when terrified/nervous. He also works as a trauma therapist, working on taking away the emotional context, so people can function without worrying about how they feel about it.

Everybody has their own fear and anxiety, but the grades of this and types will differ greatly. Our formative years dictate so much of the rest of your life. The fundamentals of who we are is said to be set by 8 years old, so if there is a negative event or trauma in your early years this can stay with you, unless you are able to deal with it. A lot of it is also learnt behaviour, if your parents were prejudiced against a particular group of people then you are likely to accept this as the norm. We now live in an age of instant gratification, which permeates in to so many different areas and often we struggle if our expectation of speed is not fulfilled. As technology advances, we have seen the introduction of cyber bullying and Mark works with schools on how to deal with this.

The way people reaction to different situations will vary greatly, this can be magnified within the workplace especially with ‘banter’.  Often people’s intentions are not malicious – they are just trying to have some fun, but you do have those that will be doing it on purpose. It can be hard for people to stand up for themselves and express their discomfort, with it sometimes not being appropriate to deal with immediately, as you may be on the back foot and feeling overly emotional. It is important to pick the correct time, often without an audience as others may not have been impacted in the same way. It can help to step back from the situation, rather than reacting in the moment which may be from a place of anger. There is still a lot of discrimination within the workplace which can reinforce limiting beliefs. This is often not helped by the company leaders, who need to look at their company culture and how this is implemented across the business.

Mark has run programmes with three different train operating companies training staff in assertiveness and giving them techniques to deal with difficult customers. Their aim is to be focused on customer service, but not at any cost. The training instilled confidence in the staff, something that Mark finds very gratifying. They need to find the right balance of assertiveness without aggression. As part of the training, they deliberately frighten people, setting up intimidating scenarios to provoke fear and anxiety in order for them to learn to deal with this in real life situations.


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Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Mark Wingfield Mark Wingfield
MAX Conflict Management
ByJoanne

It’s never too late to be what you might have been

Amy is a strong advocate for being a midlife beginner after starting multiple businesses in her forties; a Coach, Mentor, Podcaster, Mastermind Host, Speaker and Property Investor who inspires and empowers clients to discover the life they dream of.

Amy believes who you are, what you do and what you have is all within your control and what you want to have determines what you become and what you do. She is a strong advocate for switching from just existing to living. Like the Henry Ford quote, ‘whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.’ You must put the effort in to get results.

 
Published Published: 31.12.2020 Recorded Recorded: 23.11.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:00:15 Downloads Downloads: 41
 

In your midlife Amy believes you can leverage the experience you have amassed and turn it into something you have a passion for. Doing things because they are right for you, rather than being worried about other people’s opinions.  Growing up Amy said her generation had limited exposure to opportunities, very different to nowadays with the use of the internet, which meant you can often set off on a path and fall into a career that you are not totally sure about, and often get stuck with this. 

Amy has two children and the best piece of advice she was given was to treat them individually, rather than equally. As a parent you are making the best decisions with the choices you have at that moment. By focusing on her passion and building her businesses her husband was able to step back from a hugely stressful role and they are now able to spend more time together as a family.

Due to COVID-19 and lockdown we have all had to slow down, meaning a lot of people have used this period as an opportunity to press the reset button and pursue their passions. Often a trauma or catalyst triggers a lifestyle change, but Amy is trying to teach people that you don’t have to wait, by taking responsibility and becoming more self-aware of who we are and what you want to do is empowering. She worries that too many people are sleep walking through their lives. She explains that it doesn’t have to be a huge change, it can be small things – taking time to prioritise what is important to you and what you enjoy doing, perhaps through that realising there are opportunities that can turn your vocation into a profession. It takes time to invest in yourself and your abilities, all about personal development and banishing limiting beliefs and imposter syndrome, perhaps making ourselves lifelong learners, because as Amy says, ‘she doesn’t even know what she still doesn’t know.’

Our self-talk is critical and has a huge impact on how we can move forward. Amy advocates writing a journal, especially in the morning, as by writing our negative or limiting thoughts down we stop carrying them with us and they become less powerful. We have over 60,000 thoughts a day, many of which are repetitive and negative. Often when we are in the moment, we can’t see the bigger picture and get stuck. Recognise all the little steps and celebrate the small wins that occur.

We feel belonging when really listened to, so checking in with others and checking in on our mental health is so important. We need to feel able to share our experiences. Amy has been quite conscious of filtering out negative elements in her world and focusing on the positives. Need to focus on solid relationships and your circle of friends, making sure they are having a positive impact on your life. Shift in mindset and that you are in control, see obstacles as being on your way, not in your way.


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Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Amy Rowlinson Amy Rowlinson
Focus on Why
ByJoanne

Planting a seed of kindness and understanding

Ryals a singer and song writer who was born and raised in the Ukraine talks about how he moved to New York where he got married to his husband to begin a new life

Growing up in Ukraine, Ryals lived through the revolution, a time of suppression where he did not feel comfortable to come out as gay. It was only through moving to the US and finally coming out that he found acceptance and was able to let go off the anger he had held onto for so many years. He is now using his lyrics to empower people because, as he says, “we are all the same at the core and all need acceptance and love.”

 
Published Published: 24.12.2020 Recorded Recorded: 15.09.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:12:25 Downloads Downloads: 34
 

Ryal’s stepfather raised him from 18 months until he passed away in 2013, he was a spiritual influence within his life and planted the seed in him from a young age of kindness, love, and empathy to others. He started this process in him, turning the little boy into a man with understanding and instilled in him that although he may not always have the answers he needed to carry on.

Growing up in Ukraine, Ryals kept the fact that he was gay hidden due to societal pressures. Early on in life he developed a shield to protect himself from others, showing them that he could not be hurt. He always believed there would be a place in the world he did belong, aged 18 he moved to the US, leaving behind family and friends to start a new part of his life.

Ryals was in the Ukraine during the revolution and explained it as a very scary period living in a supressed society. He said that even when he moved to America it was hard to shake off the years of shame and oppression and come out as openly gay. When he did come out as he was full of anger for the years, he had spent living a life that was not authentic. Not feeling accepted or accepting himself had created a huge barrier between him and his family, although when he did tell them the response was largely positive.  Ryal says it is easy to forget, living with acceptance in the US, that in the Ukraine many people still feel unable to come out and there are many countries where being gay is still punishable by incarceration or even death. Some countries are regressing and now have anti-LGBT agendas.

Aged 13 Ryals started writing songs to share his emotions. He has released his own album and writes songs for other artists, one of which was created for the Eurovision. He uses his music to try and empower others to live more freely and be kinder. He now feels ready to speak his truth and help others who have experienced similar things. He suffered with depression during his teens after falling in love with another boy and not understanding what the feelings meant, or what to do with them.  

Ryals couldn’t find his life in the Ukraine and was worried about settling into life in the US when his family lived so far away. He struggled to find peace and sought therapy to resolve this. He had grown up thinking the whole world was against him and had so much hate towards his country and people because of it. He is now thankful for this experience because it makes him appreciate what he has and how he is now able to be himself, which he never felt he was able to be within the Ukraine. By finding love and peace he feels like his life has meaning, which is why he is passionate about being the voice to help others. 

Ryals wants to plant the seed that you can expand yourself and try new experiences before deciding what you want to do. We are often told that we must make one decision and stick with it, but we should all be able to find our own direction.

We should all try and find our own version of happy.


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SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Ryals Ryals
ByJoanne

Anti-racism work is not rocket science

Merel, who describes herself as a "wise woman and a crone", talks about how she believes anti-racism work can be delivered to white people in a way that is non-threatening and ensures that people don't become defensive.

A white male seems to become the default norm that we benchmark others upon, and we want to assimilate everyone to the same standards. The western world has built its economy on power, wealth and control and we want to compete and be better than others, and we assume everyone feels the same way. We still do not see other cultures as on a level playing field to us – it still matters where you come from and we fear the unknown. To become anti-racist needs not only a fundamental change on an individual level, but also as a culture and how do we take the first steps to achieve this? But if we were to embrace our differences would we all have more enriched lives?

 
Published Published: 17.12.2020 Recorded Recorded: 02.09.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:06:02 Downloads Downloads: 39
 

Joanne sat down to talk to Merel van Haastert to discuss ‘Anti-racism work is not rocket science.’

A white male seems to become the default norm that we benchmark others upon, and we want to assimilate everyone to the same standards. The western world has built its economy on power, wealth and control and we want to compete and be better than others, and we assume everyone feels the same way. We still do not see other cultures as on a level playing field to us – it still matters where you come from and we fear the unknown.

To become anti-racist needs not only a fundamental change on an individual level, but also as a culture and how do we take the first steps to achieve this? But if we were to embrace our differences would we all have more enriched lives?

Merel lives in the Netherlands and owns her own company, ‘Solid Ground’ which conducts energy and spiritual work, where she guides people through problems they encounter in their lives. She believes when talking about anti-racism there is nothing out there that we do not know. All of the information is there, we just need to see it. She accepts that it is difficult, indoctrination built up in layers from childhood, but she believes the soul knows. Everyone is the same, irrelevant of skin colour. Young children do not have the filters to see people as different – so we need to try and take ourselves back to this.

White people find this a difficult subject to talk about and tend to take it personally, on an individual level, rather than looking at it as a system that we were born into. We forget that we have ‘white culture’ – the settled norms and values that are imprinted upon us. Similarly, we have a white narrative that we are so used to we no longer consider unusual. White becomes our privilege, and we cannot tell, as it is always there. Merel says you need an entry to see the wider scope of the world, you almost have an advantage when you are not the standard. The amount you do not fit, allows you to see and pick up on different perspectives and see other narratives.

We marginalise people by categorising them and diminish their lived experiences. White has become the default, we put ourselves in the centre of the world and then everything relates to you. There is still a hierarchy within white highlighted by our views on immigrants; we have jokes about the French, Italians etc. Racism is more than white/black people, it can be between communities, religions etc. We categorise and label people based on where they are from. Merel explains that despite 70% of inhabitants of Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, being from different cultural backgrounds, the standard is still that being Dutch means you are white and from the Netherlands, and they are not considered equal citizens. As part of the systemic racism people will often hear, ‘go back to your country’ because they do not see them as being part of where they are from.

Due to colonialism, we feel a sense of entitlement to the world’s history, our ancestors have given us the idea that the world is ours. We made it our default economy, with the power and privilege that we have today gained from wealth we plundered from other cultures. We have even use science to justify our actions, with scientists studying brain sizes and determining that a white male would be more intelligent than others. We used science to promote white supremacy. We think we have evolved past all of this and that we are now racially accepting, but this is not in the past, we still set ourselves above others as western society and consider other areas as third world, who just need to come up to our level.

We are not used to thinking of white people as a group, a culture. We need to think about what this means, and what this means for the rest of the world. We do have freedom of speech, but it is still not widely accepted to go against our government, we are brought up to follow authority. We are taught from a very young age that family is everything, so people do not want to do anything that will put them outside of their group, as this can be a very lonely place. As an individual it is very difficult to affect the social structure, we have power, but it is difficult to weald this without a community approach.

Merel set up ‘Project ColorWhite’ initially to create a safe space for women but has now expanded to encompass all white people to allow them to discuss the world that they want and how to break down their beliefs and ideas around racism. She has found this quite difficult as people still carry a lot of guilt for their ancestors.


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Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Merel van Haastert Merel van Haastert
Wise Women at Solid Ground
ByJoanne

Creating a level playing field in attitude and action

Sarah is a trainer, consultant, and public speaker. She joins us to talk about the role we can all play in creating a level playing field in attitude and action.

Sarah is passionate about creating a culture that raises others up to allow the creation of a level playing field. We discuss how she has overcome her own fears and now uses her voice to challenge our systemic and historical inequalities. We live in an unequal world and need to recognise what we can do to empower others and ourselves to change this. By creating an open dialogue, we can begin to make our workforces more agile and as a result more inclusive. The recent pandemic has highlighted the importance of inclusive practices and acted as an accelerator for change, but how do we ensure that this continues?

 
Published Published: 10.12.2020 Recorded Recorded: 27.08.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:07:15 Downloads Downloads: 21
 

Inequality is a systemic, historic issue and we need to recognise what we can do to empower others and ourselves to accept that, although we are not all on an equal playing field yet, we can all work together to achieve this. We can do this through championing and investing in potential, as opposed to focusing on where we are currently. There is currently too much difference to even consider us equal.

Sarah uses her position to give others a voice, she speaks on behalf of those who are either not confident enough to do so, or feel they are not able. She believes that if we can utilise words that are often associated with negativity, such as bias and privilege in a positive way we can begin to shift culture forward. We need to learn to implement day to day strategies that ensure change. A systemic, cultural change needs to occur, and for this to happen we all need to step up/step forward and give support.

The importance and urgency of inclusive practice stepped up due to the COVID pandemic, driving quite a monumental change. This highlights that workplaces can change, but before this pandemic there was not the same level of urgency to achieve this. Sarah believes we have seen more change in the last few months, than in the last decade. Changes in flexibility, working from home, wellbeing. We need to keep hold of what we have learnt during this period and keep it moving forward. Similarly, to the Paralympics in London, during this time we started to see an inclusive and accessible London but this did not continue, we need to maintain momentum and attitude in order to continue change and we can only do this via proactive engagement.

One ongoing issue is the assumption that a person’s disability is their defining characteristic and not considering how other elements may affect them when working at home. We assume being at home, as it will be more accessible, will be better for them.

Sarah found when interviewing for roles she had to do more and put herself at a higher standard. She had to be more qualified and experienced than other candidates in order to feel as though she was on a level playing field. Recruiters do not consider your background, or challenges that you have experienced to get to that point. Similarly, we can write people off at a certain age when they would have many more years of experience and contributions to make.

Companies can have a diverse workforce, but without inclusion they will not see the value, the two must go hand in hand. You can hire someone with a disability, but you then need to operate inclusive leadership and have productive engagement to ensure you receive the best from them. This needs to happen immediately and not at their first review/6 months down the line. We must understand that difference can bring worth. Many workplaces do not know what to do with people with speech impairments, often due to fear of the unknown and not having the resources to allow the person to feel comfortable and do their job well. There are very few role models with speech impairments, especially on boards. Sarah is still working on feeling comfortable with the way that she speaks, but she pushes through this as she wants to try and help others overcome their fears.

Sarah has been working on a holistic approach questionnaire, that starts from induction and opens a two-way conversation that is co-created with the employee to ensure that they are able to reach their potential, allowing for an equal playfield in the workplace. 


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Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Sarah Burrell Sarah Burrell
Sarah Burrell Inclusion
ByJoanne

Autism from an Autistic parent’s perspective

This is a story based on Laurie’s experience as an Autistic Parent of an Autistic child and how tackles the stereotypes and misconceptions of what it is like to be Autistic

Join Laurie as they give a no-hold bared view of how their are so many misconceptions of Autistic People, the language, terminology and tropes that propagate many myths. Laurie is themselves an autistic person and is also the parent of autistic children. They share some insights of the challenges they face parenting and in the world of other parents and society. Laurie is a trainer and speaker on the topic of autistic and neurodiversity inclusion to make the workplace accessible.

 
Published Published: 15.10.2020 Recorded Recorded: 18.08.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:06:53 Downloads Downloads: 64
 

Joanne sat down to talk to Laurie Morgen to discuss ‘Autism from an Autistic Parent’s Perspective.’

Laurie recently published a book called ‘Travelling by Train, The Journey of an Autistic Parent’. The consistent theme that she has heard from parents through her research and the autism training she delivers is that once their child receives an autism diagnosis they are also given a long list of things they are never going to achieve; they will never live independently, form successful relationships, learn to drive etc, all the things we expect human beings to be able to do. This sets the bar of expectation exceptionally low; if we do not expect our children to be able to achieve these things, then why do we bother? It is a mistake that professionals make, signing these children off before their life has begun. If professionals have negative connotations about autistic people, then their opinion of an autistic parent with an autistic child/children is that they are not capable of raising their children, they are seen as being somehow deficient as a parent. We should be challenging autism myths and having a more open dialogue about autistic people as parents. Without this they are at risk of having their children removed from them, or having unnecessary involvement from social services etc.

It has only been in relatively recent years that people have been receiving autism diagnosis, and while Laurie acknowledges that progress is being made, she wants more. She was only diagnosed herself at aged 44 when she was researching for her son and recognised the symptoms in herself. Being dyslexic now does not have the same stigmas attached to it as it did 40-50 years ago, so Laurie’s hope is that the same happens with autism and it is seen in a more positive light. The original studies of autism were not conducted by trained psychologists, which a lot of our subsequent understanding has been based on. They only studied boys and it remains even today much harder to diagnose girls/women, as most of the research is on typically presenting males. Laurie further questions this research by suggesting that perhaps the children in these studies were not showing empathy because they did not understand what they were being asked to do, or were frightened, which masked their emotions? These studies were conducted in laboratories in artificial circumstances, so were the children presenting in ways that were not usual for them. If they were studied in their natural environments would we see a completely different picture?

Laurie feels that she is representing the autism community, even if she says she is an individual there will be others that experience the same difficulties she does. She wants to honour the community by being a mouthpiece for them and representing them in a positive light – by being presentable, articulate she automatically busts a myth. Autism is not a learning difficulty, a higher proportion of autistic people don’t have learning difficulties, over those that do. Another myth is that Asperger’s and Autism are separate, when in fact the terms are used interchangeably. Asperger’s is a form of autism and comes under the autism spectrum. It is a functioning label, and you can be disadvantaged by these as it adds confusion. A person must fit all negative criteria to get their diagnosis, but then to get support and help they look at all the things you can do.

Laurie finds that she has difficulty relating to women, she is generalising with this statement but notes that they often provide more information than they necessarily need to when explaining themselves. Laurie refers to this as Country lane conversation, whereas autistic people tend to be motorway thinkers and motorway talkers, very direct. She feels we could all benefit from an autistic person’s efficiency, by learning to be more direct and ‘cutting to the chase.’ Laurie believes that within the recruitment process social skills should not matter, and that a person should be judged solely on their ability to perform the duties related to that role. We should stop worrying whether they will fit in with the company’s culture.


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Brought to you by your host
Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Laurie Morgen Laurie Morgen
Different by default
ByJoanne

Being inclusive means leaving no one behind

Jacqui works with in the space that is creating accessible systems of the future. Working with governments and the UN she is at the forefront in ensuring the future is inclusive for all.

As an Internet of Things (IoT) innovator she not only creates the future but she also shapes it. Jacqui talks about the challenges that she is advising the UN and governments from around the world on creating technology and online systems that are inclusive for all, and when she says for all, she means all people from every country. Jacqui has spoken at Davos and met with the father of the modern internet, Tim Berners-Lee. We explore how the world has changed over the last 20 to 30 years due to the birth and growth of the internet, but we must also recognise that we must remain vigilant of Bad Actors and the Dark Web. How this technology develops as the norm for Gen-Alpha and Gen-Beta will shape the world for the future. How can we now ensure that the Boomers and Gen-Xers are not left behind? Listen in to this fascinating conversation with someone right at the heart of this evolution.

 
Published Published: 08.10.2020 Recorded Recorded: 14.08.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:12:58 Downloads Downloads: 49
 

Joanne sat down to talk to Dr Jacqui Taylor of Flying Binary and discuss ‘Being Inclusive Means Leaving No One Behind.’

Jacqui is a Web scientist who started out her career as an aerospace engineer. Her mission is to build technology that includes everyone. She is trying to achieve this through deep technology, which is built from engineering principles, but includes major scientific advances. She is utilising talent, originally from Generation Z, but now also Generation Alpha. Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web wanted to connect humanity to its own truth, and Jacqui’s work is a continuation of this.

11 years ago, only 18% of the world was on the web, but now this is over 50% and there is more capacity available than those that choose to be connected, meaning that for anyone who wants to join they can as soon as they make that personal choice. Jacqui’s company works on the technology to make this vision true and on ensuring no one is left behind in the process, which is what she means by inclusion. She also works on the dark web and cyber space to maintain vision, despite phenomenon of cyber criminals.

Every generation can be connected now, should they wish to be, but generation Alpha are the first generation to be fully immersed in technology. Jacqui calls them the curious generation; they have no concept of information not being immediately available. Generation Z are web entrepreneurs, who influence 40% of the economic spend across the world and introduced us to the explore phase. It is no coincidence that inclusion is becoming so pervasive and a focus for so much of the world because gen alpha knows no reason why it shouldn’t be. There will be an acceleration in the adoption of the web with them. Gen Beta will affect the direction of spend and influence, they will amplify change and carry on work of Gen Z.

Our growing use of technology, especially in younger generations means digital detoxes are becoming a thing of the past, and if we never switch off what effect does this have on our mental health? Jacqui believes that lockdown has helped with this, as we have understood our dependency on human interaction and social contact. It has also highlighted that not everything we access online is good for us but telling the difference can be a minefield. Jacqui has started a project, ‘the social guardian’ to safeguard young people on the web, something that generation alpha have said they need. Online harm is often not transparent, so this app was created to support mental health and show young people how to navigate the online world, allowing them their own options,  whilst understanding when it is not safe for them personally.

With the constant introduction of new technology, the gulf between generations is rapidly increasing, if you are not tech savvy and adaptable to new thinking you are becoming obsolete in demands for the future. People need to be AI, dark web, cybercrime savvy etc. Jacqui says that these changes and advancements are for everyone and that today is only a signal for how far away we are from where we are going to be.

At present only 40 countries could say their digital economy had the skills to copy a file, or to use emails. So, technology is on a huge spectrum and we need to use digital skills to bridge this gap. Jacqui is working on collateral to help entrepreneurs work on their growth agenda to meet the new economy. If you can get your business and what you deliver 10% online, then you are well positioned for the new future Jacqui talks about.

The current COVID pandemic has accelerated many job roles become obsolete, through automation and AI. We used to build our expertise up throughout our career, so how do you now get on to this pathway? Advisory AI – machine does ‘heavy lifting’ gives human output which they then decide whether this matters and what to do with it, decide how we configure our world. Our future workforce will look very different – 80% of current jobs will no longer exist.


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Brought to you by your host
Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Dr Jacqui Taylor Dr Jacqui Taylor
Flying Binary
ByJoanne

Why isn’t our public transport network accessible for all?

Andy is a Paralympian who specialises in creating accessible spaces. He joins us to talk about his work with the public transport network and the need for true accessibility for all

Disabled people face a real challenge when using public transport. If we focus on the social model of disability then it is the environment that leads a person to be restricted or denied service due to the disability. Andy talks about the work he does with transport companies, especially one particular rail franchise's approach to Inclusive design for services, that takes into account the necessary adjustments to ensure people of any disability can find that they are being considered. He also talks about his experience as a Paralympian and how his life changed for ever during a sporting event in his youth. There is plenty here for organisations to take away in terms of steering their own thinking around accessibility for all.

 
Published Published: 01.10.2020 Recorded Recorded: 10.08.2020 Episode Length Duration: 1:02:26 Downloads Downloads: 238
 

Joanne sat down to talk to Andy Barrow, a Paralympian to discuss ‘Why isn’t our public transport network accessible for all?’

Andy has been a wheelchair user for over 20 years since he broke his neck in a freak sporting accident, so he understands the landscape and accepts that there are certain aspects of public transport that are going to be very difficult to make accessible, the tube for example. In instances like this we must look at accessibility through assistance. The two major issues Andy has experienced are that processes often do not allow the staff trying to assist the passengers the best chance to give them the assistance they need and second is the culture – the organisations/staff not understanding the importance of the assistance, which is to allow people to navigate the world independently.

Negative travel experiences can really impact people, affecting their confidence and potential future travel plans. Andy feels, due to the confidence he gained through working in sports and his vast travelling that he needs to be a mouthpiece for others, who perhaps don’t have this. Being in the minority you often feel nervous about the number of unknowns before you travel – what is the accessibility like at the station you are travelling to, will there be someone there who is able to help?  Andy now works at SouthEastern to try and ensure that people can all turn up and travel as and how they want to. He accepts that mistakes are going to happen, but it is about how they are dealt with. The frustration from these mistakes is time, when it is only one mistake that may be fine, but when it builds up it is time costs taken out of your day, every single day/week/month/year. Having a severe disability has been equated to having a full time, 30 hour a week job in terms of time cost, just to live. Organisations should be judged by their plan B, when things go wrong how do they deal with it. Often, they try too hard to give a one size fits all, based on their perception of you. But we should be looking at equality vs equity -what is your ideal customer experience? Two people with the same disability may still have a drastically different idea of what this would look like, and this needs to be, within the realms of safety respected.

When Andy used to travel as an athlete on aeroplanes there were incidents where wheelchairs did not arrive and this can be disempowering, disappointing and embarrassing, especially when the assistance you are being offered, often being pushed through the airport, is not what

 you want. Wheelchairs are bespoke to the users; you cannot just be changed out of them. You want to be empowered to be independent as individuals. Andy is in a position of power as he knows if he was to remain in his seat and refuse to move, this has a knock-on cost implication to the airline. He does acknowledge that the blame can be unfairly placed on airlines, when the airport may contract out assistance services, so there are different dynamics at play.

Company culture needs to permeate through to all employees, and treatment of staff and engagement needs to be considered for this. Employees need to understand why accessibility for passengers is important and Andy believes if companies treat their staff well, the staff in turn will treat customers well. They need to avoid blame culture, accepting mistakes happen but look at training and ways to overcome this. If people feel empowered, they will be happy to take on responsibility and potentially break rules, but for the right reasons. No one sets out to make someone’s journey/day difficult, but it is the fear of being wrong, getting it wrong and then the consequences. Communication needs to be improved, training as often decisions need to be made in split seconds.

Andy understands that companies must cater to the bell curve, but everyone with a disability is different and hidden disabilities must also be considered. The question should be what do you need to put you at parity with everyone else travelling today? By giving the passenger the power of choice, ensuring they feel empowered they will have a positive experience.


Please connect with our hosts and guests, why not make contact..?


Brought to you by your host
Joanne Lockwood Joanne Lockwood
SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Andy Barrow Andy Barrow
Andy Barrow Consulting
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