Podcasts

ByJoanne Lockwood

Busting the myths of inter-generational stereotypes

Henry works with generations in the workforce to help them become more productive and effective. She gives us an overview of the generations, busts some myths and provides us with some hacks for getting the best out of every generation in the workforce.

Stereotyping occurs across all generations, and all involve myths, such as someone being ‘being past your sell by date’, or younger people ‘having no experience’. The challenge with myths is that we all have them and need to work to quell them and instead learn more about each other and accept and celebrate differences and variations.

 
Published Published: 13.01.2022 Recorded Recorded: 06.01.2022 Episode Length Duration: 1:08:25 Downloads Downloads: 183
 

Henry is an intergenerational specialist and although she does not like the use of labels, when working with organisations she uses them as parameters to discuss how the world has changed. As part of this she explains there are periodic factors and cohort factors that influence generations differently. She explains a periodic factor is a big world event, such as COVID, that impacts everyone but in different ways, depending on age. As we age we become more experienced emotionally intelligent amd are affected by events in different ways then we would have been in earlier life. The cohort factor impacts generations or part of a generation and could be something that other generations may not even be aware of, or have very little interest in, i.e. gaming or snapchat. By breaking things down in this way it helps Henry and the organisations she works with look at specific areas where they may be challenges within the workforce. (influencers)

In our ever-advancing world it is very easy to become addicted to social media and Henry explains that this may be down to the relationships and community they create. Older generations tend to have two key communities, friends/family and the workplace. For younger people their second community is their social media feed, so they don’t build the same community that maybe older generations would have done at their age. They therefore do not have the same connection or loyalty within their role. The younger generations tend to make decisions based on money and Henry says this is not a great surprise, especially considering that it was people aged between 16-24 that made up the highest category of furloughed or lost jobs during COVID. Organisations need to be aware they are financially led and will make a career move based on this, but Henry says this should be seen as an opportunity for talent acquisition, seeing it as a chance to perhaps win their talent back at a later stage. Older generations often judge this ‘jumping ship’ mentality negatively, rather than understanding the reasoning behind it. It costs 5 to 7xs more to find someone new rather than retain current talent, but we know jobs are no longer for life, so Henry works with organisations to maximise how long each employee will stay in a role, which will save them money. She says organisations need to be aware of how the world has changed and become proactive, viewing retention as their responsibility.

Since COVID there are two tiers of workers, those that need to go into work to do their work and the other are hybrid and remote working. Whist globally the majority of the workforce do still attend a formal work setting, there is conflict over whether younger generations want to return to the office at all and whether working from home negatively impacts their career trajectory and mental health. With language changing so quickly and new words constantly being introduced, Henry says the younger generation still need to the chance to communicate and express themselves in a face-to-face setting effectively.

Henry is passionate about ageism at both ends of the spectrum. Organisations still see older generations as being ‘past it’, or having less to offer, rather than seeing the experience that would be lost if they leave/retire and younger generations, who are viewed as having less to offer, tend to be the first ones to be let go during any troubling times. She wants everyone to be viewed as individuals and calls for us to view work as a family, which will ebb and flow but where everyone is appreciated for who they are, not judged on age etc. Without this we run the risk of it being transactional.


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SEE Change Happen

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Henry Rose Lee Henry Rose Lee
intergeneralexpert.com
ByJoanne Lockwood

Being on the periphery of society

Khakan always felt "different", on the peripheral of any circle - family, social, political or otherwise. With a background is in Health & Social Care he is acutely aware of what it means to be treated differently when from a more marginalised community.

Khakan felt, even from a young age that he did not really fit in. He felt different but was not able to label it. He felt that he wasn’t masculine enough to fit in with boys and stood out for liking to play with dolls and what were perceived as typically feminine games. He also didn’t fit in with girls as at school as they didn’t like to mix with boys.

 
Published Published: 06.01.2022 Recorded Recorded: 07.12.2021 Episode Length Duration: 1:01:33 Downloads Downloads: 53
 

Khakan was born and bred in the Midlands, but comes from south Asian heritage and here he also struggled as he didn’t feel Muslim enough or south Asian enough. This manifested into him always feeling like the outsider and being marked as different, because it was picked up in every facet of his life from not only his sexual orientation and gender identity, but also how he presented culturally and with his ethnicity. He didn’t quite fit in to any group and this made him shy and introverted.

Khakan explains that the history of Islam is quite progressive, so although his family adhered to certain Muslim traditions, they were quite liberal. Growing up he had to learn how to integrate this into his life, whilst also trying to fit in with British culture. Despite being quite liberal there are still taboo subjects and members of Khakan’s family do not accept that he is gay. Growing up feeling unable to express himself he realised he needed to assert his personality and identity, something he found possible after moving away to London. It was once he returned home that he felt confident enough to come out to his mum after this, something that he had been dreading, especially with the cultural dynamics. His mum was very accepting, but his dad had a different attitude and was quite homophobic. Khakan now realises much of the reason they clashed was because they share many of the same characteristics. His father was also an activist trying to join the Asian and British communities and Khakan is following in these footsteps but also looking at LGBT equality in the Asian community.

Growing up his family had very high expectations of him, especially being youngest of 7 and this expectation caused him to have a lot of conflicting questions as he tried to work out if he was gay, bisexual etc and this impacted his mental health. He experienced a lot of religious guilt, with a level of oppression coming from each side, politically, socially & family. He struggled to find anyone to talk to – especially around such taboo subjects. It took him a long term to come to terms with who he was.

In his relationship with his partner, Khakan has seen the evolution of gay rights, which are now recognised and validated by the world. Early on in their relationship he did not feel comfortable to be open at work. A turning point for him was attending an Aids Awareness Workshop, one of other attendees said to him that she didn’t understand gay people – at the time he didn’t have the confidence to respond, but this prompted him to realise that he needed to speak up as her comments made him so angry.

Khakan wishes people had confidence to be who they need and want to be. Within his work in health & social care they are seeing more anxiety and depression being experienced by young people, than ever before, which could be as a result of COVID. He says we all need to be mindful of everyone’s mental health pressures as everyone has different aspects in their lives to contend with. He says if we can introduce respect and inclusivity so that everyone can be accepted and loved for who they are then we would hopefully see lower mental health issues. He believes everyone will have felt on the periphery at some point in our lives and this makes you re-think life and how you navigate through it.


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SEE Change Happen

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Khakan Qureshi Khakan Qureshi
Finding A Voice
ByJoanne Lockwood

Everyone should feel as though they belong, are welcome and valued

Esi is an advocate for disability inclusion in the workplace and longs for a world where disabled people are treated equitably in every cornerstone of life and that their disability is recognised and celebrated, and feel that they belong and are valued.

Status quo about what being welcome and valued should be, inclusion is a feeling that comes from within, so if we don’t feel included it is because what society or a specific organisation/business are doing does not help us feel included. They should be creating an environment that is open to everyone – to Esi it should feel like a breath of fresh air, rather than for her, as a wheelchair user having to mitigate all of the barriers she is confronted with.

 
Published Published: 30.12.2021 Recorded Recorded: 06.12.2021 Episode Length Duration: 0:59:44 Downloads Downloads: 66
 

Attitude barriers are compounding the barriers for disabled people and these tend to be based on our internalised biases. We have opinions on disabilities and therefore what disabled people can achieve and disabled people often internalise this, based on the medias portrayal and what they have been taught growing up have their own internalised biases and internalised ‘abalisims’. Esi believes  we need to support everyone to make them feel that they belong and that they are equal with that belonging.

Esi explains when accessibility is being designed it is not often thought through in practical terms, many treat it as a ‘tick box’ exercise, where they have to meet legal requirements and no further. She has seen accessible toilets blocked by a table in a restaurant, so in order to use diners had to be moved. To avoid these common mistakes organisations need to engage with people with the lived experience because they can support you to ensure that it is considered from every angle and make the experience equal to that of a non-disabled person.

Everyday tasks cause Esi unseen challenges, or delays that an able bodied person would not consider i.e. having to wait to be let through at a ticket barrier, no dropped curbs resulting in needing to find alternative routes, this can add a huge amount of time on a journey, often resulting, Esi explains in her arriving late and dishevelled to a meeting/event and impacting how she is perceived and often reinforcing an unconscious bias that it’s a pain to get a wheelchair user to a venue. This creates a barrier up for disabled people in everyday activities.

Esi feels that often people overcompensate for the fact she’s a wheelchair user, which makes it harder for her to feel as though she is able to engage in conversations or relax at events. Countless times in a day she will need to educate people on different elements of her life – i.e how she is able to handshake and that she does not want to ‘fist bump’. She explains this as an invisible backpack of barriers, causing exhaustion and impacting her desire to repeat the activity, which can result in less opportunities/work/socialising.

The Government launched a National Disability Strategy in September, but Esi explains there was no real understanding of the barriers faced by the disabled community, after only interviewing 16 disabled people were interviewed as a supposed representation of the UK. So from the beginning the strategy was set to fail. There is an argument that this was deliberate, a strategic move to say they are going to do something, without needing to. Esi’s concern is that this further embeds in society that disabled people are not as important as’…….’ So if the government are not doing anything substantial, so the issues/barriers can’t be too bad.


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SEE Change Happen

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Esi Hardy Esi Hardy
Celebrating Disability
ByJoanne Lockwood

Domestic abuse must not be tolerated

Andrew talks about domestic abuse following his own previous experiences in a former marriage. His passion is to generate awareness of all the faces of domestic abuse, including parents abused by children, LGBTQ+, male victims, and women abused by men.

Andrew, in a former marriage, was a long-term victim of domestic abuse. He is now a passionate campaigner on the topic and takes a non-gender stance to it.

 
Published Published: 23.12.2021 Recorded Recorded: 02.12.2021 Episode Length Duration: 0:59:12 Downloads Downloads: 60
 

The language surrounding abuse often portrays the overwhelming majority of victims as woman and perpetrators as men. Andrew queries this based on statistics which show approximately 1/3 of victims are men, and of this third the vast majority the perpetrator has female. He feels so passionate about this subject after experiencing it first hand and finding it very difficult, as a man to both be honest and open about what was happening, for fear of not being believed or being ridiculed. He now wants to create awareness and shine a spotlight on all facets of domestic abuse.

He states that talking about abuse can feel shameful, and by being an active campaigner he doesn’t want to take the spotlight away from women, he just wants to make sure everyone feels able to share their own stories. We need an official strategy that targets violence against men and boys as well, if we are serious about equality. Statistics don’t include underreporting against men, as there is still a stigma associated with this, with our human bias default still being that men are strong, women are weak.

With the new bill based through parliament there is now a new official definition of domestic abuse, which includes cohesive control, economic abuse not just physical violence. Andrew states that gaslighting can be a huge culprit of abuse, which is where the abuser makes the victim question their sanity and judgement. We often hear abusers described as having some form of personality disorder or being a narcissist, but from experience Andrew explains that many abusers change tactics daily, causing a rollercoaster of emotions so that the victim never knows where they are and are constantly trying to work out the triggers.

Since leaving his abusive marriage, Andrew is aware that he never used to have any set boundaries. He has since created a 3-stage boundaries model; 1 a line in the sand – where you have a desired outcome, but you wouldn’t be too upset if this wasn’t achieved. 2, flexible fencing – you have desired or preferred outcome, so the end result matters more to you, but there is still some flexibility and finally 3, castle walls where there is no negotiation or compromise. He created this suite of boundaries to help him preserve his easy-going nature but set rules and help him navigate different situations. This has helped him to know when to apply these different boundaries, realising that there may be consequences attached and deciding if he had the resources to deal with that.

For everyone the words ‘No, Stop and enough’, should be instantly respected. These are words that we need to learn not only for ourselves, with the conviction that when used they are meant, but also respected when said to us. Andrew is hopeful that we are raising a generation of young people to not only know their own ‘stop and enough’, but also respect others and he believes through this we stand a good chance of boundaries being set and maintained. This will also assist people being able to spot early signs of abuse and gaslighting, especially if we know we can constantly question and amend our boundaries as we evolve. Andrew believes we owe it to the younger generation that they can identify this and know that it is non gendered.

Since working in the field Andrew is aware how divisive it can be, and is keen for everyone, rather than seeing each other as competition, to come together to raise awareness. We need to challenge the currently very gendered narrative and realise that everyone shares an equal responsibility, we can’t vilify one sex as they become disengaged and only creates further division.


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SEE Change Happen

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Andrew Pain Andrew Pain
Andrew Pain
ByJoanne Lockwood

Assimilation is not necessary

Hung, who is a “triple immigrant”, believes that there is no truth, only consensus, and the manner in which we collectively cope with this revelation will define how gentle or cruel our future humanity is going to be.

Hung as a “triple migrant” believes when you are from an ethnic background that is not native to a country you end up living in, although you learn to follow the social rules and obey cultural values, you may never fully feel part of that group, without caveat. He remembers from his childhood trying to work out how he could belong better so that he didn’t stand out, even trying to wash his face for longer to make it appear whiter, after taunts that he looked dirty. This need to fit in can go in the wrong direction, with built up bitterness at not feeling including leading to either the person trying to over correct, becoming hyper assimilated, or going the other way and rejecting the culture that rejected you, and risking becoming permanently marginalised. Hung wants everyone to understand that it is OK to not feel like you belong.

 
Published Published: 16.12.2021 Recorded Recorded: 24.11.2021 Episode Length Duration: 1:00:57 Downloads Downloads: 60
 

Hung believes that inclusion is a bit of an oxymoron, as we recognise explicitly that there are things we do not include. This highlights a real problem with the terminology we use as it is trying to tell us we are universally inclusive or diverse, which is not the case. This automatically creates a barrier and a division of who is in and who is out. We can’t say privilege does not exist, especially when it is so apparent in prominent places, but Hung wants us to question what the best techniques are to generate the best outcomes for the most people. Lots of younger people want to overhaul the whole political system, but Hung feels revolutions don’t often end well, and believes in incremental change, trying to modify the system from ground up, and creating a parallel system if it is too resistant to change, rather than destroying all we have.

There are some people who want a revolution, believing change isn’t happening quickly enough and others who don’t want change, and want to defend their privilege. Similar to the outcome from Brexit, which was hugely divisive, these polarised opinions often mean the people in the middle get tugged into extreme positions by the loudest voices, as those on the edge often feel more passionately about it, so tend to have a louder voice than their numbers may suggest. On spectrum the extreme edge become amplified, narrative shapers and risk becoming part of an echo chamber.

Hung believes that ideas should be viewed and treated as tools to interpret the world, but that are disposable as you learn and develop, perhaps discovering different ways that may work better. Instead he sees people committing themselves early on to an idea and then shutting off the brain waves on it, not wanting or having the time to re-examine the world.


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SEE Change Happen

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Hung Lee Hung Lee
Recruiting Brainfood
ByJoanne Lockwood

Peeling back our layers to uncover our Essence

Michelle was in Sri Lanka on boxing day 2004 as the Tsunami hit. The impact of that highlighted to her that each of us have our own inner Essence that makes us who we are, She has now developed her own programmes for assessing people in organisations

Michelle always thought she understood human behaviour but began to question this after she was caught in the 2004 boxing day tsunami in Sri Lanka. It was during the aftermath she learnt she didn’t know as much as she thought, as she witnessed people, she knew acting in ways she didn’t expect or recognise, driven by something she wasn’t aware of, their core subconscious driving forces.

 
Published Published: 09.12.2021 Recorded Recorded: 22.11.2021 Episode Length Duration: 1:02:11 Downloads Downloads: 54
 

She believes it is in spikes of adversity we see the true potential of humanity. After this experience she turned her back on her successful career and changed direction of her life to try and make sense from what she had learnt and turn it in to lessons for others. Giving others the benefit of the lessons, without the awful experience she had. This sparked wanting to learn more about behaviour, how we behave and react, but she wanted to understand the why, which is what led her to core values, which she calls core driving forces, our subconscious drivers, our essence.

Michelle was embarrassed by her initial reaction to the tsunami, which was to pick up her camera, rather than to wonder who she could help. She states that it took her a long time to find peace with this it only came from being able to truly understand who she is and therefore how and why she reacted the way she did.

Michelle believes that when you understand what your driving forces are as long as you align to that, then you achieve fulfilment. She now works with different organisations using an analysis tool she has designed, which shows people how they will react in different scenarios. Michelle states usually people don’t know how they will react, until it happens and although we may think we know how we, or a loved one will react, if ir doesn’t happen it can affect our perception and relationships. We can’t help our reactions; we can just try to understand it.

Her dream is to work with people coming out of the forces, as they adjust to civilian life to find out what motivates them, without the strict rules they have been accustomed to. She also wants to work with children aged 4+ to help them understand their own driving forces as she feels this would give them powerful tools that will help shape the direction of their futures.


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SEE Change Happen

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Michelle Mills-Porter Michelle Mills-Porter
The People Reader Ltd
ByJoanne Lockwood

Learning to talk, to listen and to learn

Iain believes that the “Why of D&I” is quite simple. Everyone should be given the same opportunities and feel included and be encourage to open their eyes, to talk, to listen and to learn.

Iain is a 54-year-old heterosexual white male whose wish is for everyone to just be able to be themselves. He is aware that these characteristics put him in a privileged position, so he was worked hard to raise his own awareness on the topic of diversity and inclusion.

 
Published Published: 02.12.2021 Recorded Recorded: 12.11.2021 Episode Length Duration: 1:07:15 Downloads Downloads: 88
 

Whilst growing up Iain’s parents did charity work; his mum working for the Samaritans, which exposed him to lots of people he didn’t know, experiences which he thinks moulded him into the person he is today. Despite this background he still used to be worried about getting into difficult conversations for fear of getting it wrong, although he came to realise in order to get to know people you just have to be willing to make the time and effort and ask questions in a kind, non-judgemental way, you just need to be prepared to listen, learn and understand.

Part of the issue that many organisations faced during lockdown was how to keep everyone connected and ensure no one is missed from the conversation. Within Iain’s workplace they started a program of events to get colleagues together in a safe space where they felt comfortable to share stories, allowing conversations that many had not had the confidence to join in with previously. It gave people permission to learn and normalise conversations on subjects that are often considered taboo. The impact for Iain, on an individual level is that he can then recognise what other people are going through in his private life, for example having learnt more about the menopause he feels he can recognise and offer support to his wife who is experiencing this at the moment.

Iain believes that many people are naturally culturally curious, but you do have others that are not interested and it is with these people that Iain feels you need to choose your battle, deciding whether you want to be drawn in to a potential argument. He is aware of this, as a regular at sporting events, he often hears opinions being expressed that within another setting he would challenge. His advice is to try and keep conversations on perspectives and the ‘why’ they hold the opinions they do, rather than making it confrontational.

With the advances in technology, we have become so used to communicating online, often using abbreviated terms, that the art of face-to-face conversation is dying out. Communication in this way is also prone to misinterpretation, where our choice of words or punctuation can be misconstrued. Both Iain and Joanne tend to use emojis in their messaging to express how they are feeling, clearly showing if they are happy/sad etc.


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SEE Change Happen

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Iain Chapman Iain Chapman
Aon
ByJoanne Lockwood

Building steppingstones to a better future

Rachel is radio presenter with Sonder Radio in Manchester. who present her own show. As an Aussie transgender woman she has amassed varied experience in her life from being a Nurse, prospector and more recently a Transgender advocate.

Rachel is a dual national who sees her home as Australia, despite being born and now residing in the UK. She lives in the North and is proud to possess a unique mix of accents. She now works as a broadcaster after a career in nursing, a talent she says she has always had but that needed the right set of circumstances to come out.

 
Published Published: 26.11.2021 Recorded Recorded: 09.11.2021 Episode Length Duration: 1:10:28 Downloads Downloads: 71
 

Rachel started transitioning in her early 50’s, so has been living as a trans woman for nearly 12 years. Despite this being a huge part of her life, she does not want it to define her, although this does tend to be what others focus on. Since her transition she has seen enormous changes in how trans people are perceived and believes that headway is being made, although worries that some of this progress is being lost and that the LGBTQ+ have to defend rights that once were ‘just there’. Both Rachel and Joanne say there are still areas of the world that are not viable for the LGBT community, where the members may not feel comfortable or that they need to try and hide their true selves, something that is not possible for trans individuals. Rachel feels that the world has shrunk/become narrow for the community, something that she finds quite scary. Joanne has faced no issues with traditional western Europe, just feels that she would need to be more cautious the further east she travelled.

Before transitioning Rachel had no experience of the LGBT community but the second she started taking hormones she was thrown into the world and told by society that this was where she now belonged, so had to find where she fit. She now feels confident that she has found her place, but at the beginning had to almost take herself on a crash course to learn about this new world. This was a space she had got away with not knowing anything about, but as soon as it affected her life and how society viewed her, she needed to know everything about it. Rachel believes trans gender individuals often have a different viewpoint on society, having experienced it from both male and female perspectives, something Rachel believes should be nurtured and ensured is passed on to the next generation and assist in moving away from binary rules. She believes those that have come before identified the issues that the community faced and it is now our generation and future ones that need to carry this mission forward


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Rachel Oliver Rachel Oliver
Soder Radio
ByJoanne Lockwood

Equality is not just a ‘nice to have’, it is a must

Niels helps managers to become better leaders by making them master the concept of sustainable leadership. He also works to bring Diversity and Inclusion to the centre of attention of organisations and the people who work there.

Many organisations say that they treat equality, diversity & inclusion as a ‘must have’, yet often it is an area where budget is not prioritised, raising the question as to whether this is now a ‘tick box’ exercise designed to merely avoid scrutiny

 
Published Published: 18.11.2021 Recorded Recorded: 05.11.2021 Episode Length Duration: 1:00:59 Downloads Downloads: 72
 

McKinsey conducted research where the results show 43% of companies that have a diversity workforce can drive better results. Niels therefore states that as a leader when you are not diverse you are actively harming the organisation.

Many people are still scared to engage with D&I for fear of getting wrong or asking the wrong question. Organisations have therefore got to allow education through training, so they are not constrained by this and staff are assisted in becoming culturally competent. Niels believes that organisations need to invest in continual training of their staff, remembering that this needs refreshing, as society changes. He says it only takes one badly thought-out phrase in public to harm the organisation. All too often organisations rely on e-learning for this, which can be problematic because it is not tailored, and people need interaction where they are able to ask questions in a ‘live’ circumstance so they can learn and be better next time.

Niels was surprised when he moved to the UK from Germany that organisations could be judged based on their postcode. We still hear the statement that ‘when people work hard, they will get what they deserve’, which gives the impression that anyone can achieve anything if they work hard enough, without considering that for some, whether it be social standing, education etc, will have an advantage. Meritocracy only exists if we all start in the same situation

As a leader within an organisation your job is to take pride in others success, without taking any credit and this is something that Niels says many struggle with. All too often senior staff all come from a certain network, perhaps graduating from one of the top 5 universities and are recruited because they are the norm and what has always been. To a new employee this can give the impression that the firm is not diverse, or it is not something that is important to them. Quite often it is because we are locked into the belief system that what has come before has worked, so why would we change it. Niels says that individuals in these positions need to see their privilege and let others come forward to ensure everyone is given a fair chance. Many leaders are worried diversity will impact them on a personal level and they want to remain in their ‘privilege bubble’, so try and protect themselves against it. Instead, we should be recruiting based on who is the best person for the job.


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SEE Change Happen

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Niels Brabandt Niels Brabandt
NB Networks
ByJoanne Lockwood

Escaping the echo chamber of D&I lingo

Greg is a global D&I director who is frustrated by the level of performative action in industry and the reliance of the same old soundbites that don’t effectively move the needle on diversity and inclusion.

Greg believes we reuse the same lingo and terminology, i.e. ‘bringing your authentic self to work’, used as well-meaning terms, but without unpicking both what they mean to us and the people we are using it on. He believes people get caught up on the ‘lingo’ rather than the motivation behind the statement.

 
Published Published: 11.11.2021 Recorded Recorded: 26.10.2021 Episode Length Duration: 1:01:10 Downloads Downloads: 88
 

We don’t all share the same experience of work, so although we can set up broad ambitions for the statement ‘bring your whole self to work’, until we understand how everyday work decisions impact on different diversity groups, it is very difficult to meet that ambition. Greg states that to achieve this you need to delve into the detail – looking at the actions that need to happen at a granular level – do our actions and tactics help us achieve these ambitions and match back to the terminology we are using.

Working within the D&I space, Greg is always conscious that he does not want to alienate any groups of people from the conversation, especially those that hold the privilege and power and can help drive the conversation. By shutting them off from the conversation you move the burden back to under-represented groups to drive the change, inadvertently pushing it back to the people that really need to see the change. Leaders need to understand what they can do to drive change and leverage their power.

Greg argues that change happens in the everyday actions of individuals, not in training rooms. It is a continual process, with no ‘one size fits all’ model and requires constant feedback and adaptation. You need to be able to measure the effectiveness of programs that are being run, deciding beforehand what change you hope to bring about by running it, how it will make a difference to the organisation, focusing on the outcomes and how this will tie into the company strategy. A D&I strategy is meaningless if it is not experienced day to day by everyone in the organisation.

Greg thinks organisations need to stop measuring employee engagement by the majority, instead looking at the data from different diversity groups. Change is only going to come if you can close the experience gap for people, so the corporate strategy has to be understood and followed by everyone so that it is embedded within the organisation.

Since end of lockdown some organisations are leaning towards dictating flexibility, whereas others are leaving it entirely to employees. Greg believes with this new way of working, employers need to ensure that they test, adapt and learn, with a continual feedback loop so that they can understand what the hybrid working experience is like for all employees. He suggests that we need to let go of traditional working restraints and consider what type of experience do we want people to have – what we did yesterday is no longer good enough for today. We want to ensure that a new starter working remotely still has a great experience and is not impacted by missing out on social capital.


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SEE Change Happen

A huge thank you to our wonderful guest
Greg McCaw Greg McCaw
Flutter Entertainment Plc
SEE Change Happen: Transgender Awareness & Inclusion